21 October 2017

Statement from Camallergy on the results from DBV Technologies of their phase 3 trial of Viaskin skin patch for peanut allergy which has failed

Camallergy's oral immunotherapy, using a different approach to DBV's, is based on years of research and real-life patient experience and has been created by experts from Cambridge, UK. 

Dr Andrew Clark said: "Camallergy's oral immunotherapy demonstrated strong results in Phase 2 showing this method is the only real option to treat people with peanut allergy. Compared to the only other drug in Phase 3, our straightforward course of therapy means patients spend less time in clinic, making it easier and more convenient for families. 

Camallergy’s data-driven approach is based on actual clinical experience which has helped to shape its treatment to respond to patients’ expectations. Based in Cambridge UK, the company was set up by CEO Sherden Timmins and world-leading allergy experts Dr Pam Ewan and Dr Andrew Clark, and has been treating patients with a prototype product for 2 years.

  • Camallergy is developing an oral immunotherapy treatment for peanut allergy, based on strong Phase 2 results and real-life clinic experience.
  • Their lead product for peanut allergy CA002 will enter Phase 3 trials in 2018.
  • Their only competitor in Phase 3 is Aimmune Therapeutics AR101. 
  • Camallergy’s treatment CA002 aims to make it easier for patients and physicians, and reduces the number and length of treatment visits, using their patented treatment regime.
  • DBV Technologies, whose skin patch Viaskin uses a different and unproven approach, announced on 20th October 2017 their failure to reach their primary outcome measure in Phase 3. This followed weak Phase 2 results.
  • Oral immunotherapy remains the only viable treatment in late-phase development for peanut allergy; the only such treatment with strong results in Phase 2 trials.
  • Camallergy is currently seeking investment to conduct multinational Phase 3 trials to confirm their results and make their treatment widely available.

Phase 2 results and clinic experience require confirmation in larger Phase 3 studies. 

Camallergy (trading name for Cambridge Allergy Ltd) was spun out from Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) following the results of the STOP2 study published in the The Lancet, to continue the development of treatments for food allergies. Camallergy's mission is to develop life-changing treatments for people with food allergies. Its lead product treats peanut allergy, a serious and increasingly prevalent disease with no licensed treatment.